Brian Hoek | Enginuity Power Systems - Part 5
 

Author: Brian Hoek

Nobody should wish what happened in California the past few summers, or Texas this winter, on any region, state, or community. One state faced their worst fires ever, the other a massive ice storm, and both succumbed to blackouts substantially impacting the quality of life...

Enginuity Power Systems is very much a “green” focused company, putting together a technically elegant – yet user friendly – affordable solution for home-by-home independence from the highly inefficient and aging electrical grid, and in doing so helping homeowners contribute to lowering the billions of...

Senior Mechanical & Combustion Development Engineer Enginuity is growing fast and we are constantly looking for talented individuals to join our team. We are anticipating growth in the areas of accounting and finance, business development, mechanical and electrical engineering, software development and government proposal writing. Experience with...

An Even Better Choice Is In The Near Future Back-up power generators are a must for homeowners located in storm belts or regions of the country where rolling blackouts are on the rise. Modern standby generators fueled by natural gas feeding the unit from buried pipelines are...

As solar availability grows and prices decline, a growing number of homeowners are turning to battery-backed solar energy systems to power their homes. Many choose to remain tied to the grid, so that they have the opportunity for net metering. All works well – until a...

"A year ago we announced an $800,000 Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratory, sponsored by the DOE Building Technologies Office, to help develop our private home generation appliance – the E|ONE – with the...

The average US household produces 7.5 tons of CO2 equivalents per year, contributing to the tens of trillions of tons of U.S. emissions that are quickly changing our environment. 20% of US emissions are from heating, cooling, and powering households – such as natural gas for...

If you reside in Japan, you’ll lose power to your dwelling – on average – once every 20 years. The average U.S. customer loses power once every 9 months. That’s EXCLUDING power failures from hurricanes and other storms, let alone fires. A growing number of consumers are saying...